1. mizufae:

    pastel-gizibe:

    shannonwest:

    equalityandthecity:

    (via Students help Emma Sulkowicz carry mattress to class in first collective carry)

    Y E S 

    IT IS GETTING BETTER

    When I first read about this woman’s plan I thought it was a strong idea but I was worried that it was a little bit much for one person, no matter how dedicated, to keep it up for too long, especially since she has, you know, college to commit to. I never thought about how, if other people helped her carry her burden, I never thought about how much it would look like pallbearers with a coffin. Which is simply one of the strongest visual symbols one can use to disturb people in the western world.

    (via theminiskirt)

     
  2. mizufae:

    pastel-gizibe:

    shannonwest:

    equalityandthecity:

    (via Students help Emma Sulkowicz carry mattress to class in first collective carry)

    Y E S 

    IT IS GETTING BETTER

    When I first read about this woman’s plan I thought it was a strong idea but I was worried that it was a little bit much for one person, no matter how dedicated, to keep it up for too long, especially since she has, you know, college to commit to. I never thought about how, if other people helped her carry her burden, I never thought about how much it would look like pallbearers with a coffin. Which is simply one of the strongest visual symbols one can use to disturb people in the western world.

    (via areemeers)

     

  3. "So I put my arms down and wrapped them around me. I began healing by embracing myself through the foreboding darkness until the sunrise shone on my face."
    — 

    Janet Mock, Redefining Realness

    yall this book is a MUST READ. gives me hope. 

    (via thoughtsofalexx)

    Some final words from Redefining Realness.

    (via feminism5ever)

    (via areemeers)

     

  4. theminiskirt:

    theroguefeminist:

    you know there’s something wrong with our society when they put a rape victim/survivor leading a protest against her school’s reaction toward her rape on the cover of magazine with the words SEXUAL REVOLUTION in giant letters over her image and “movement…

    Also, to be fair, they called it “A Very Different Kind of Sexual Revolution On Campus” This suggests—“we know what you’re thinking, and we’re about to subvert it.” If that’s what it takes to get people to notice and to listen, fine.

    And: Emma’s project has made international news. Many people know what her goal is. It is especially familiar to New Yorkers, who are the primary readership of New York magazine. Would it have been better to use the word “rape”? Maybe, but again many people are familiar with Emma’s story. Even if they’re not, the mattress says a lot about what kind of assault she’s standing up to.

     

  5. theminiskirt:

    theroguefeminist:

    you know there’s something wrong with our society when they put a rape victim/survivor leading a protest against her school’s reaction toward her rape on the cover of magazine with the words SEXUAL REVOLUTION in giant letters over her image and “movement…

    But that’s what I mean by it is a sexual revolution. We are talking about the same thing: As you say, “our culture’s conception of sexuality and sex itself is instilled in rape culture: how abuse and predatory behavior and men’s objectification of women and entitlement to female bodies has become part and parcel for how sexuality is constructed in our patriarchal society. The way many men approach sex is rape culture.”

    Emphasis mine. From my perspective, Emma and other activists are fighting back against that male entitlement to female bodies, and that truly is a sexual revolution, a very welcome one. I’m sorry I just don’t understand how calling it that is objectifying her or the cause or perpetuating anything negative. And I also don’t think of “sexual revolution” as bad wording for feminism or as a problematic term for women. I associate that phrase with women finally being able to own their sexuality, and having agency where previously we had none.

    So agree to disagree, I guess?

     

  6. theroguefeminist:

    you know there’s something wrong with our society when they put a rape victim/survivor leading a protest against her school’s reaction toward her rape on the cover of magazine with the words SEXUAL REVOLUTION in giant letters over her image and “movement against assault” in tiny letters in the corner

    Respectfully, I disagree.  The reason college rapists aren’t punished and victims are silenced is because too often, our culture codifies actual rape as “nonconsensual sex” or worse, simply “sex.” Rape is not sex, of course, and that’s the point these women are trying to make. In that way, it is a sexual revolution because these women are opening up a conversation about the way we think about “sex” on college campuses.

    It is wonderful that NYmag is giving Emma’s project, her story and her point a platform. And the way they photographed her is not objectifying, it’s very powerful. It’s not like they put her in a bikini or something.

    I haven’t read the piece yet, and V. Grigoriadis has a history of victim-blaming so we’ll see how the article turns out.

     
  7. let-them-eat-vag:

    ashoutintothevoid:

    Emma Sulkowicz is on the cover of this month’s New York Magazine and that is the coolest thing wow

    DUUUUDE this is a huge fucking deal honestly

    AMAZING!!

    (via frayama)

     

  8. "Psychologists have found that people’s belief in a just world helps explain how they react to innocent victims of negative life circumstances. People become cognitively frustrated when presented with stories of victims who suffer through little fault of their own. They can deal with this frustration in two ways: they can conclude that the world is an unjust place, or they can decide that the victim is somehow to blame. Most people reconcile their psychological distress by blaming the victim. Even when we know that suffering is undeserved, it is psychologically easier to blame the victim rather than give up the idea that the world is basically fair."
    — Melissa Harris-Perry [x] (via aerialiste)

    (via mydaywithd)

     
  9. realitytvgifs:

    what

    Seriously, the reaction to every one of those SMS screenshots of entitled dudes demanding attention from women who have no interest in them.

     

  10. "I tell my students, ‘When you get these jobs that you have been so brilliantly trained for, just remember that your real job is that if you are free, you need to free somebody else. If you have some power, then your job is to empower somebody else. This is not just a grab-bag candy game.’"